Mind the gap

Mind the gap: Does your organisation have the capability to deliver against the customer pain points of the over 50’s?

Mind the gap.

If you’ve ever caught the London Underground, this cautionary warning would be familiar. ‘Mind the gap’ is also a valuable analogy for customer pain points in business.

A desire to understand and focus on the customer experience (CX) or user experience (UX) is the language of marketers – online or offline. Simultaneously, customer journey mapping has become increasingly common. Yet, how often do we also seek to understand and investigate the challenges of key stakeholders and staff to provide an excellent customer experience – particularly for those customers over 50 years of age? What’s the gap between customer reality and employee empathy?

Whilst a customer focus enables us to better understand the decision-making process of people using or buying our products, stakeholder and staff insights provide greater understanding of what is required internally for improved service delivery. Knowing both is essential if customer pain points are truly to be resolved.

The pain points

Pain points will appear in various parts of the business – either online, on the phone, or in person. An example illustrates some of the issues.

Recently a woman in her 70’s, call her ‘Mary’, told me the difficulties of cancelling her subscription to a television service. After a lengthy conversation with a customer service operator, she was only passed to a supervisor after revealing that she was about to cry.

The pain points:

  1. The call centre staff member was bound by a script that didn’t accommodate a customer with limited technological ability;
  2. The process for cancellations was inflexible. Apparently, the only way a customer can cancel the service is online. Consequently, the operator was trained to “talk through” this process with customers who had difficulty;
  3. A solution was only sought when tears of frustration were imminent.

The result

Mary,

  1. Won’t have another pay television subscription service;
  2. Will never return to the telco provider who consistently lacked awareness and empathy;
  3. Tells her friends and anyone else who will listen about her experiences.

Whilst Mary has a mobile phone, uses an iPad, does online banking, and happily searches Google, she lacks confidence to do new tasks in the online world. The call centre staff member failed to understand Mary’s situation and was therefore unable to accommodate her needs.

Due to years of frustration and poor customer experience caused by a lack of understanding, Mary has also changed her phone provider. In one instance she was sold a plan that provided her with substantial download capacity. However, she had advised staff that her mobile phone was only used for texts and calls. When in the telcos retail stores she consistently observed people her age upset and angry due to lack of empathy by store staff.

Whilst this anecdote is a single sample, it’s a common story.

Gaps and the over 50s

Leading magazines, blogs, and newspapers consistently report on the ignored market of our ageing population.

A report by the Australian Services Union reveals that the average age of call centre staff is between 33 (men) and 37 (women). A report by PwC in 2016 revealed that the average media person is a 27 year old white male who only speaks one language – English. It’s likely that employees under 40 will either ignore or exacerbate stereotypes of consumers over 50. Why? Because they don’t identify with this older age group.

Gaps, facts, and 50’s+

Yet, in Australia, there are almost 6.5 million people between 50 and 74 years of age. That’s 27% of the total population!

The value of this age group is substantial. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) 2017 Census, the average age of middle wealth households is 54, and for high wealth households it’s 58. And, whilst a proportion of this wealth is associated with increased expenditure for medical care and health expenses, the ABS also reports that,

“Recreation, household furnishings and equipment, clothing and footwear, and miscellaneous goods and services also rose as net worth rose.”

Consequently, when we evaluate market size against wealth, it seems naive not to have a strategy to reach and effectively service this audience.

Nonetheless, despite these facts, age stereotypes and ageism negatively impact attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions about people over 50.

Finding the gap

A customer journey map is simply a framework that captures the customer experience. A customer journey map overlaid with either staff interviews or staff journey mapping reveals the gap. One without the other is interesting and informative. However, to optimize the opportunity, organisations must ‘Mind the Gap’. The gap is where true opportunity exists.

Given that almost one-third of Australia’s population are baby boomers, it’s remarkable that organisations are not more mindful of this market. After all, chances are that a proportion of most companies’ customers will be in this age bracket. Does your staff understand them? Or, do age stereotypes abound?

Speaking with staff potentially reveals unknown or unspoken age stereotypes. Internal pain points will reveal restrictions that limit market growth with this rapidly expanding segment of the population. Knowing staff attitudes and beliefs about becoming older, coupled with insights on customer pain points has the power to reap rewards – to plug ‘The Gap’.

Closing the Gap

Closing the gap requires guts. Consequently, it means addressing both customer and organisational pain points. For example, staff may need training, processes may need adapting, or organisational structures may constrain service. Change starts with these 4 questions:

  1. What proportion of your customer base is over 50 years old?
  2. What’s the impact to your business if they disappeared?
  3. What proportion of your workforce is under 50 years of age?
  4. What are their attitudes and beliefs about people over 50? Ask. Answers are usually associated with age-based stereotypes.

If a gap exists then business growth is inhibited.

 

Three Sisters Group specialises in the longevity economy. We provide expertise and research-based consultancy services for customer driven strategic change. To tap into this under-serviced, largely ignored market, contact us.

Seizing the Damocles Sword of Parkinson’s Disease: the Emotional Core of Innovation

I recently accompanied my father to Solothurn, Switzerland for a neurosurgical operation to treat his Parkinson’s Disease (PD). The surgery has led to an incredible, life-enhancing outcome for Dad. However, by meeting the neurosurgeons and learning more about their little-known but world-leading work, I’ve learned the power of human emotion in driving groundbreaking innovation.

The Damocles Sword of Parkinson’s Disease

Imagine constantly feeling like you’re trapped inside your own body. A withering body. Exhausted from years of uncontrollable tremors and rigid, sore, aching muscles. Lifting a fork to your mouth is such an effort, you consider giving up after each bite of food. Food that you can no longer smell or taste. Your partner has now become your full-time carer.  Feeding, dressing and catering to your every need. This was a small vignette into the daily life of my father who, at 63 years of age, suffers from Parkinson’s Disease.

But that was 5 days ago. Today, just days after a pallidothalamic tractotomy on his brain, Dad is regaining his motor and sensory functions. He can now lift a fork with ease, taste and smell his food! My Dad suffered for 12 years with a disease that was slowly breaking his body down and destroying the very essence of who he is: a keen sportsman; ever-loving husband and father; and, highly successful business person. It’s impossible to describe the joy I’ve experienced observing his self-rediscovery since the operation.

The Customer Experience & Emotion

So what does this have to do with business?

Dad’s procedure had its genesis in the recognition of the role emotional stress can play in the development of Parkinson’s.

This experience suggests that understanding the emotion behind a patient’s disease or a customer’s problem, reveals opportunities to resolve the core issue or problem. The little-known team of neurosurgeons in Solothurn is just one incredible example of the power of emotion in driving innovation. They challenged established wisdom to create a therapy that doesn’t just improve symptoms. It also removes the fear PD patients have of further deterioration (the Damocles sword).

Whether undertaking customer journey mapping or co-designing for innovation, understanding the whole customer and their emotional experiences is essential. Through this knowledge the opportunities to innovate and improve customer experience arise.

Unfortunately, this remarkable treatment for Parkinson’s Disease is not available to all PD sufferers.  Why not?

Three reasons:

  1. Availability. MRI-guided focused ultrasound technology is relatively new and only a small handful of neurosurgeons have used it to perform the procedure Dad underwent.
  2. Access. The particular procedure is offered in limited locations globally.
  3. Price. Public health systems and private health insurance do not fund the procedure. The exception is Switzerland, where the procedure is fully funded by the country’s basic health and accident insurance.

The Opportunity of Emotion

The lessons from Solothurn for business?

  1. Understand the whole customer and the emotions at the pain points in their journey with your organisation.
  2. Assuming your goal is to create products and services for a market niche, ensure it is both accessible and affordable.
  3. Customer-centred design is the key to innovation.

Is your organisation fully understanding the emotional foundation of the problems faced by your older customers? Speak to Three Sisters Group today for deep customer insight and the opportunity to transform your customer experience.

 

Photo by Ricardo Cruz on Unsplash

 

Are smart homes the key to healthy ageing?

It’s time we scrapped the idea of smart homes as the province of the young and digitally savvy. Research shows that smart homes could be the cornerstone of healthy ageing. In fact, smart technologies enable older Australians to live longer, safely, and independently at home and in the community.

Baby boomers such as Bill Gates and Steve Jobs made technology accessible to everyone. The internet came to market during the 70’s. This availability of computers, laptops, and information at our fingertips means that the majority of baby boomers are technology literate. So whilst considered ‘technology immigrants’, on the whole, this generation embraces technology.

Consequently, there is an unrealised opportunity to market smart home technologies to baby boomers. The boomers have larger purchasing power and higher levels of education than previous generations. They are also fitter, healthier, and more technology literate than their parents or grandparents. And, this generation want to remain in their own homes. Forever. Moreover, they expect to use intuitive and cost-effective technology, particularly if it promotes independence, quality of life and well-being.

As Dr Helen Meese from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers suggests:

“Creating a home which encourages its occupants to stay mobile and active as they age has the potential to keep them both mentally and physically fit for longer.” 

So what does the future hold for smart homes for older Australians?

The New Aged Home

A smart home is:

“a residence that uses internet-connected devices to enable the remote monitoring and management of appliances and systems, such as lighting and heating.” 

However, besides the image of the high tech ‘aware’ home, the wide range of smart home technologies available to support older adults to live at home and remain independent, is largely unknown. From passive and active sensors; monitoring systems to environmental control systems; and electronic aids to daily living – technology has the potential to transform our lives as we age. And let’s not forget Voice-First technology – a multilingual technology with enormous potential. 

Although as Laurie Orlov suggests there are still many questions and much research to be done to understand whether “Voice-First” is more hype than helpful.  

Australia is considered slow in the smart home technology uptake. However, this is predicted to radically change. In fact, the industry is forecast to grow from a $377million industry in 2016 to a $4.7billion industry in 2021. 

What’s the Impact?

Delivering enhanced customer experiences (CX) for business growth is the mantra amongst marketers today. Developers, architects, builders, and renovation specialists have the opportunity to innovate by meeting the needs of the burgeoning baby boomer market with smart home technology. Healthcare providers have the potential to improve the experience of their customers by introducing smart technology such as that available from Feros Care or eHomeCare.

Whilst technology does not replace human contact or reduce loneliness, it can contribute to providing individuals, carers, family, and loved ones with a sense of safety, security, and connection. With health and aged care costs predicted to balloon over the next couple of decades as the population ages, technology, is realistically, a practical part of the solution to reduce those costs.

Given that …

  1. Australia’s population is ageing – already one-third of us are over 50 years old.
  2. The majority of people want to age in their own homes.
  3. Attitudes of older people towards technology are not as stereotypes suggest. They’re surprisingly open to using technology. 

… what assumptions is your organisation making about the ability of older people to utilise and engage with technology? How can you establish a competitive difference or obtain growth by better understanding your current and potential customers?

If you would like to explore these questions and consider how your organisation might deliver products, services, or a better customer experience for the over 50’s, contact us.

 

Photo by Kevin Bhagat on Unsplash

Is de-greying your workforce hurting customer experience?

Companies are adaptable, creative and profitable despite the age of their workforce. At least this is what a growing body of research is showing. So why do we have HR policies and practices that, however unintentionally, work to de-grey our workplaces? What are the impacts of our unconscious biases and ill-conceived stereotypes of older people on innovation and service delivery? Ultimately, what is the impact on the customer experience?

An Enormous Missed Opportunity

As author and activist, Ashton Applewhite, affirms,

“we live in a culture that tells us that getting older means shuffling off stage”.

Nowhere is this culture more pronounced, and damaging, than in the workplace. We’ve all heard stories of older customers (and workers) being treated less than favourably on the basis of their age or perceived age.

Baby boomers represent a vast, unprecedented, untapped market. In fact, they represent a quarter of the Australian population. And according to the Property Council of Australia (2015), almost 80% of baby boomers own their home, representing an enormous financial resource. Yet, this generation is often either ignored or neglected when it comes to customer experience. Engaging all staff to improve the customer experience of older customers is crucial to realising the potential of this market. To do this, organisations must create:

  1. An organisational culture and workforce of engaged employees committed to stopping ageism in its tracks.
  2. An environment that seeks opportunity amongst older customers by encouraging the development of new products and services and/or modifying existing offerings.

Why De-grey the workforce?

Already, McKinsey has revealed the bottom line benefits to companies offering an exceptional customer experience. The gross margins of these companies can exceed those of their competitors by more than 26 per cent. However, the recent Deloitte report Missing Out reveals the missed opportunity of capitalising on a diverse workforce – including older workers – to improve the experience diverse customers have with an organisation. For example, the report found that less than half (41%) of customers surveyed believe that organisations treat customers respectfully, regardless of their personal characteristics.

What’s Your Organisation’s Pulse?

Given the current and future size of the ageing population and workforce, it’s essential companies examine the attitudes and beliefs of their employees towards older people. Through an Ageing Attitudes Pulse Check, companies not only get a snapshot of the current mood of the workplace when it comes to older people, they potentially  have access to deep insights into how this could be affecting the quality of service delivery and levels of innovation among workers – both young and old.

The pulse check can provide companies with the opportunity to:

  1. Enhance the awareness of unconscious biases and stereotypes held about  older customers and workers.
  2. Educate their workforce on the value, diversity and capabilities of older customers and older workers.
  3. Explore options, through market research, to re-design or co-create products, services and business processes that are age friendly.
  4. Examine the role of older workers for enhancing the experience of older customers.

For a Hollywood example of how older workers can improve the customer experience of older customers. Take a look at this short scene from The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel of Judi Dench training younger call centre staff.

If you’d like to know more about how an Ageing Attitudes Pulse Check will benefit your company, contact us.

 

Photo by Fabrizio Verrecchia on Unsplash