Posts

Are smart homes the key to healthy ageing?

It’s time we scrapped the idea of smart homes as the province of the young and digitally savvy. Research shows that smart homes could be the cornerstone of healthy ageing. In fact, smart technologies enable older Australians to live longer, safely, and independently at home and in the community.

Baby boomers such as Bill Gates and Steve Jobs made technology accessible to everyone. The internet came to market during the 70’s. This availability of computers, laptops, and information at our fingertips means that the majority of baby boomers are technology literate. So whilst considered ‘technology immigrants’, on the whole, this generation embraces technology.

Consequently, there is an unrealised opportunity to market smart home technologies to baby boomers. The boomers have larger purchasing power and higher levels of education than previous generations. They are also fitter, healthier, and more technology literate than their parents or grandparents. And, this generation want to remain in their own homes. Forever. Moreover, they expect to use intuitive and cost-effective technology, particularly if it promotes independence, quality of life and well-being.

As Dr Helen Meese from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers suggests:

“Creating a home which encourages its occupants to stay mobile and active as they age has the potential to keep them both mentally and physically fit for longer.” 

So what does the future hold for smart homes for older Australians?

The New Aged Home

A smart home is:

“a residence that uses internet-connected devices to enable the remote monitoring and management of appliances and systems, such as lighting and heating.” 

However, besides the image of the high tech ‘aware’ home, the wide range of smart home technologies available to support older adults to live at home and remain independent, is largely unknown. From passive and active sensors; monitoring systems to environmental control systems; and electronic aids to daily living – technology has the potential to transform our lives as we age. And let’s not forget Voice-First technology – a multilingual technology with enormous potential. 

Although as Laurie Orlov suggests there are still many questions and much research to be done to understand whether “Voice-First” is more hype than helpful.  

Australia is considered slow in the smart home technology uptake. However, this is predicted to radically change. In fact, the industry is forecast to grow from a $377million industry in 2016 to a $4.7billion industry in 2021. 

What’s the Impact?

Delivering enhanced customer experiences (CX) for business growth is the mantra amongst marketers today. Developers, architects, builders, and renovation specialists have the opportunity to innovate by meeting the needs of the burgeoning baby boomer market with smart home technology. Healthcare providers have the potential to improve the experience of their customers by introducing smart technology such as that available from Feros Care or eHomeCare.

Whilst technology does not replace human contact or reduce loneliness, it can contribute to providing individuals, carers, family, and loved ones with a sense of safety, security, and connection. With health and aged care costs predicted to balloon over the next couple of decades as the population ages, technology, is realistically, a practical part of the solution to reduce those costs.

Given that …

  1. Australia’s population is ageing – already one-third of us are over 50 years old.
  2. The majority of people want to age in their own homes.
  3. Attitudes of older people towards technology are not as stereotypes suggest. They’re surprisingly open to using technology. 

… what assumptions is your organisation making about the ability of older people to utilise and engage with technology? How can you establish a competitive difference or obtain growth by better understanding your current and potential customers?

If you would like to explore these questions and consider how your organisation might deliver products, services, or a better customer experience for the over 50’s, contact us.

 

Photo by Kevin Bhagat on Unsplash

Shades of white

White is white.

Until you try to choose white paint.

If you’ve ever tried to choose white paint you’ll know just how tricky it is to choose the shade of white you’d like to paint a room or a house.

Ageing is the same.  Here’s why.

Read more

4 personal lessons about ageing

The creeks had burst their banks, the only road out was flooded with water hurtling past at over 1metre high and powerful enough to sweep any vehicle downstream along with trees and all manner of debris that was loose and vulnerable to such strength and intensity. There’s no landline, no mobile, no Internet and I’m by myself.  Whilst I’m happily ensconced in the warmth of our shed with a fire constantly burning I’m acutely aware of my isolation. Combined with my forced isolation and the company of Martin Seligman and Gloria Steinem, here’s the four things I discovered about me and ageing …

Read more

Tackling technology. Why bother? And … saying ‘no’.

Many years ago I saw a landscaper standing on the path with his smart phone leaning against a rock as he did sign language. I marvelled at the freedom this technology had provided to the hearing impaired who use sign language as they could now visually communicate with each other using a phone. Smart phones, computers, the internet, and social media are all fantastic innovations. They provide freedom and connection. But for some it does neither.  For some, technology equals …

Read more