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Three Sisters Group’s read, watch and listen holiday list

The festive holiday season is well and truly upon us.  Amongst all the hustle and bustle, planning and preparations, we hope you’re able to find time for some rest and reflection. With this in mind, we’ve put together the Three Sisters Group ‘Read, Watch and Listen List’. This is our pick of some of the books, movies, shows, and podcasts that we’ve enjoyed throughout the year, as well as some old favourites. So, whichever medium you find most relaxing, sit back, relax and enjoy one or more of these masterpieces.

And if you were wondering – they’re not all about ageing! In fact, each deals with an individual theme central to the human condition.

Read

  1. ‘Daring Greatly’ – by Brene Brown
  2. ‘Wisdom at Work’ – by Chip Conley
  3. ‘The 100 Year Life’ – by Lynda Gratton & Andrew Scott
  4. ‘The Longevity Economy’ – by Joseph Coughlin
  5. This Chair Rocks’ – by Ashton Applewhite

Then there’s also my old favourite – Atul Gawande’s ‘Being Mortal’.

Watch

  1. The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
  2. Still Mine
  3. Grace & Frankie (available on Netflix)
  4. The Intern
  5. Still Alice

And of course, there’s Catherine’s TEDx talk on why retirement is redundant – now available on YouTube.

Listen

  1. How I work – by Amantha Imber, CEO Quantium
  2. Revisionist history – by Malcolm Gladwell
  3. Don’t stop us now – by Claire Hatton & Greta Thomas
  4. Better off dead – by Andrew Denton
  5. Akimbo – by Seth Godin

Finally…

Three Sisters Group will be taking some time out over the Christmas and New Year’s break. So until the new year…

We wish you, your friends, family, and loved ones a holiday break filled with love, laughter, joy, and kindness. We look forward to sharing with you more of our findings and insights on our longer lives (and what they mean for people and organisations) in 2019.

And for those who will be staying active on social media, as always, there will be an ongoing stream of the latest research and developments on the TSG Twitter and LinkedIn pages.

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Three Sisters Group works with organisations to transform and optimise their business strategies by providing insights on the over 50s and smashing age stereotypes.

Get in touch if you’d like to discuss your over-50s strategy for 2019.

 

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Photo by Khachik Simonian on Unsplash

3 impacts of workforce ageism

Imagine being 55 years of age or above. Or perhaps you are in this age group and through unforeseen circumstances (e.g. redundancy or workplace age discrimination) you lose your job. As a mature age person, on average, it will take you 68 weeks to find your next job. If you’re over 50 and currently working, you have a 27% chance of experiencing age discrimination in the workforce. Workforce ageism. We’ll all be over 50 one day, so why is ageism so prevalent in the workforce? And why should we care?

Ageism

The word ‘ageism’, first coined by Robert N. Butler, M.D. in 1969, makes assumptions and discriminates against people based on their age. Underpinning ageism are age stereotypes. Age stereotypes include everything from attitudes and beliefs about a person’s behaviour through to notions about their likes and dislikes.

It is a fact that lifespans are longer today than at any other time in history. In 2050, over 25% of Australia’s population will be over 65. Yet, beliefs about what older people can or can’t do are based on an outdated and culturally reinforced idea of what it is like to be 55. As Dr Helen Barrie states in this short video, we’ve compressed morbidity. People are not only living longer, they are living in good health for longer.

Fact: Almost 25% of Australia’s population is over 55 years of age. Yet, according to the Australian Human Rights Commission, the workforce comprises only 16% of this age group.

3 impacts of workforce ageism

There are many implications of ageist recruitment, retention, and training policies within organisations. Organisations that practice ageism are missing out on:

  1. Enhanced knowledge transfer. Older people have skills and experience that are relevant – even in an increasingly digital environment. For example, communication abilities that can encompass conflict resolution; basic workplace etiquette; and, business networks that have been developed and acquired over many years. The movie ‘The Intern’ is a classic reminder of the value older people can bring to a workplace.
  2. Quality customer service. A contact centre comprising only of young people will typically have stereotypical views of older people. This gap between internal staff knowledge and insights about older people and the customer can and does impact customer experience. This was beautifully demonstrated by Judy Dench in The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.
  3. Optimised product & service innovation and design. When there’s a poor representation of older people in an organisation there’s a risk that products or services are either:
    1. Not designed for older people; or
    2. Innovation is restricted by ageist perceptions, as is the case with the latest release of the Apple watch.

Longer lives are a gift. Addressing ageism in the workplace is overdue. However, with leadership commitment and perhaps a selfish motivation to change the situation for ourselves, a workforce without ageism is possible.


Three Sisters Group specialises in developing age-inclusive business strategies. Addressing ageism, age stereotypes, and removing biases associated with generational labelling are foundational to our work. If you would like to explore this further and learn about our survey that measures employee perceptions towards retirement, ageing, and work, contact us today.

 

Photo by Simon Wijers on Unsplash

three sisters group who is the 50 plus market

Who are the over 50’s in Australia?

The over 50’s are a third of Australia’s population.

In this 4 part series, we provide insights on baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) encompassing a range of topics from work and health to attitudes and technology. As a burgeoning market, it’s worthwhile investing time to gaining understanding as knowledge is necessary for new markets. This first part provides a brief introduction and then talks about work.

Abolish assumptions about the over 50’s

What do baby boomers need and want?

It varies.

In the first instance, it’s important to recognise the diversity within this age group. In fact as we age, we become more different rather than similar. Assuming a 50-year-old is the same as a 70-year-old is like assuming that a 20-year-old is the same as a 40-year-old. There’s as much variability amongst baby boomers or those 50+ as there is with any age group (in fact more so).

Overall baby boomers seek to be recognised and not ignored.

What about work?

One of the challenges for people as they age, particularly for the over 50’s, is that either retaining a job or getting a job becomes more difficult. However, even in employment, there’s diversity.

Often younger baby boomers don’t want to give up work. They’d like to continue to contribute in a workplace. Some seek to work full-time. Others would prefer to work part-time with a level of flexibility that accommodates volunteering, mentorship, or caring responsibilities (baby boomers are also part of the ‘sandwich generation’ – a topic I’ll explore in the future).

It’s also possible a baby boomer would like to remain working part-time in a role that carries less responsibility. The movie ‘The Intern’ is a great example of employing an older person.

Reverse mentoring” is also an emerging trend that some organisations are embracing and something that can go both ways. There’s also an opportunity for intergenerational job-sharing.

Simultaneously, older baby boomers are ready to finish work and seek other ways of being involved with community and remaining engaged and mentally stimulated.

Confused?

Don’t be. Given the increasing move to flexible workplaces, baby boomers could conceivably be the perfect fit for organisations willing to think laterally. The first step is to gain insights for understanding. Understanding potentially reveals opportunity, and ultimately, with imagination and desire, leads to innovation.

 

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We’re not too old! 5 Facts of an Older Worker

Whilst some of us are keen to finish work and never go back, many others (including me) enjoy working and want to continue doing so beyond 55 or 65. Although we can feel discarded and made to question our relevance and value in organisations, older workers have lots to offer. Working also has health benefits. But why would anyone bother hiring an older person?

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5 lessons from ‘The Intern’

OK.  It is Hollywood.  It is a little unreal.  BUT, it’s fun, funny, and I like some of what it suggests (albeit in a Hollywood way).  Here’s what I think we can learn from this movie:

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